Cookie Usage Policy


What’s a Cookie?

An HTTP cookie (also called web cookie, Internet cookie, browser cookie or simply cookie) is a small piece of data sent from a website and stored on the user’s computer by the user’s web browser while the user is browsing. Cookies were designed to be a reliable mechanism for websites to remember stateful information (such as items added in the shopping cart in an online store) or to record the user’s browsing activity (including clicking particular buttons, logging in, or recording which pages were visited in the past). They can also be used to remember arbitrary pieces of information that the user previously entered into form fields such as names, addresses, passwords, and credit card numbers.

Session cookie

A session cookie, also known as an in-memory cookie or transient cookie, exists only in temporary memory while the user navigates the website. Web browsers normally delete session cookies when the user closes the browser. Unlike other cookies, session cookies do not have an expiration date assigned to them, which is how the browser knows to treat them as session cookies.

Persistent cookie

Instead of expiring when the web browser is closed as session cookies do, a persistent cookie expires at a specific date or after a specific length of time. This means that, for the cookie’s entire lifespan (ours last 30 days), its information will be transmitted to the server every time the user visits the website that it belongs to, or every time the user views a resource belonging to that website from another website (such as an advertisement).

For this reason, persistent cookies are sometimes referred to as tracking cookies because they can be used by advertisers to record information about a user’s web browsing habits over an extended period of time. However, they are also used for “legitimate” reasons (such as keeping users logged into their accounts on websites, to avoid re-entering login credentials at every visit).

These cookies are however reset if the expiration time is reached or the user manually deletes the cookie.

Secure cookie

A secure cookie can only be transmitted over an encrypted connection (i.e. HTTPS). They cannot be transmitted over unencrypted connections (i.e. HTTP). This makes the cookie less likely to be exposed to cookie theft via eavesdropping. A cookie is made secure by adding the Secure flag to the cookie.

Browser settings

Most modern browsers support cookies and allow the user to disable them. The following are common options:

  • To enable or disable cookies completely, so that they are always accepted or always blocked.
  • To view and selectively delete cookies using a cookie manager.
  • To fully wipe all private data, including cookies.
  • By default, Internet Explorer allows third-party cookies only if they are accompanied by a P3P “CP” (Compact Policy) field.